Race, slavery, and free Blacks.
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Race, slavery, and free Blacks.

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Published by LexisNexis in Bethesda, MD .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Slavery -- Southern States -- History -- Sources,
  • Slaves -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Southern States -- History -- Sources,
  • African Americans -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- Southern States -- History -- Sources,
  • African-Americans -- History -- To 1863 -- Sources,
  • Southern States -- Race relations -- Sources,
  • Southern States -- History -- 1775-1865 -- Sources

Book details:

About the Edition

Reproduces a collection of approx. 15,000 petitions assembled by the Race and Slavery Petitions Project, University of North Carolina at Greensboro from state archives in Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia and Maryland, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Edition Notes

Other titlesPetitions to southern county courts, 1775-1867, Guide to the microfilm edition of Race, slavery, and free Blacks. Series II, Petitions to southern county courts, 1775-1867.
Statementedited by Loren Schweninger ; assistant editors, Lisa Maxwell and Chad Bowser.
GenreSources.
SeriesBlack studies research sources
ContributionsSchweninger, Loren., Maxwell, Lisa., Bowser, Chad., Race and Slavery Petitions Project.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE441, Microfilm 22,897, etc.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination<128 > microfilm reels
Number of Pages128
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17433479M
ISBN 101556558783, 0886926890, 1556559704, 0886927137, 0886927552, 0886927587
LC Control Number2002027457

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Race, Slavery, and Free Blacks, Series 2: Petitions to Southern County Courts, , Part D: North Carolina and South Carolina. Black studies research sources Summary Reproduces a collection of approx. 15, petitions assembled by the Race and Slavery Petitions Project, University of North Carolina at Greensboro from state archives in Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia and Maryland, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.   An honest discussion of race would mention what no less a figure than black Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates recently discovered: free blacks were in America before slavery. While researching the book and documentary The African-Americans: Many Rivers to Cross, Gates admits to having been shocked to discover that blacks freely came to America. Free blacks in the antebellum period—those years from the formation of the Union until the Civil War—were quite outspoken about the injustice of slavery. Their ability to express themselves, however, was determined by whether they lived in the North or the South. Free Southern blacks continued to live under the shadow of slavery.

  During slavery, freedom was tenuous for free black people: It could be challenged at any moment by any white person, and without proof of their status they could be placed into the slave trade.   Wherever and whenever slavery ended in the North, freedom generated whole new waves of racial hostility. Slavery, it turned out, rested atop the deeper foundation of a vicious racial caste order. Labor competition between white and black workers unleashed new furies of racial violence.   Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington ( -- ) Up From Slavery is the autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his slow and steady rise from a slave . Books shelved as race-racism-slavery: Scripture, Ethics, and the Possibility of Same-Sex Relationships by Karen R. Keen, I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in.

  17 Books On Race Every White Person Needs To Read. here are 17 essential books about race all this often ignored period saw thousands of black Americans move from slavery Author: Sadie Trombetta. Slavery, Slavery Slavery is the unconditional servitude of one individual to another. A slave is usually acquired by purchase and legally described as chattel John Woolman, Woolman, John Woolman, John Some Considerations on the Keeping of Negroes Reprinted in Early American Writing Published in Edited by Giles Gunn Baptism, Before slavery became a fixture on the North American. The Political Legacy of American Slavery Avidit Acharya, Stanford University Matthew Blackwell, Harvard University Maya Sen, Harvard University We show that contemporary differences in political attitudes across counties in the American South in part trace their origins to slavery. A few free blacks also owned slave holding plantations in Louisiana, Virginia, and South Carolina. Free African American Christians founded their own churches which became the hub of the economic, social, and intellectual lives of blacks in many areas of the fledgling nation.