Supplement to 1941 edition of list of bridges over the navigable waters of the United States
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Supplement to 1941 edition of list of bridges over the navigable waters of the United States bridges constructed, reconstructed or removed during period July 1, 1941 to January 1, 1948 by United States. Army. Office of the Chief of Engineers.

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Published by U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Bridges -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

At head of title: Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers.

Statementcompiled by the Office of the Chief of Engineers, United States Army.
The Physical Object
Pagination59 p. ;
Number of Pages59
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17617364M
OCLC/WorldCa19883895

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§ Geographic and jurisdictional limits of oceanic and tidal waters. (a) Ocean and coastal waters. The navigable waters of the United States over which Corps of Engineers regulatory jurisdiction extends include all ocean and coastal waters within a zone three geographic (nautical) miles seaward from the baseline (The Territorial Seas). - Description: U.S. Code Edition, Supplement 1, Title Navigation and Navigable Waters, Chapter Bridges Over Navigable Waters, Section Call Number/Physical Location Edition: The Longshore Act does not define “navigable waters of the United States”. You may have had occasion to come across definitions used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Coast Guard, or in the provisions of various environmental statutes such as the Clean Water Act. The Longshore Act does not use any of these definitions. bridges over the navigable waters of the united states: atlantic coast This publication is a directory of bridges across the navigable waters of the Atlantic Coast region of the United States. Among the types of data included for each bridge are the location, name of owner and navigation clearances.

A body of water, such as a river, canal or lake, is navigable if it is deep, wide and slow enough for a vessel to pass. Preferably there are few obstructions such as rocks or trees to avoid. Bridges must have sufficient water speed may make a channel unnavigable. Waters may be unnavigable because of ice, particularly in winter. navigable or in Corps' jurisdiction (e.g., most canals open to navigable waters in the Detroit District are considered to be to be navigable waters but are not specifically noted in this list). For tributaries to navigable waters, even though this listing may use a recognizable landmark as . Navigable Waters: Waters that provide a channel for commerce and transportation of people and goods. Under U.S. law, bodies of water are distinguished according to their use. The distinction is particularly important in the case of so-called navigable waters, which are used for business or transportation. Jurisdiction over navigable waters. List of bridges over the navigable waters of the United States. (Washington, U. S. Govt. print. off., ), by United States Army Corps of Engineers (page images at HathiTrust) An oceanographic survey for a feasibility study of a highway crossing of Turnagain Arm, Cook Inlet, Alaska / (La Jolla, Calif.: [Marine Advisers, ]), by Inc.

§ Geographic and jurisdictional limits of rivers and lakes. (a) Jurisdiction over entire bed. Federal regulatory jurisdiction, and powers of improvement for navigation, extend laterally to the entire water surface and bed of a navigable waterbody, which includes all . U.S. Coast Guard Rules and Regulations for Foreign Vessels Operating in the Navigable Waters of the United States on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. U.S. Coast Guard Rules and Regulations for Foreign Vessels Operating in the Navigable Waters of the United StatesPrice: $ (b) Navigable waters of the United States and navigable waters, as used in sections and of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. and , mean: (1) Navigable waters of the United States as defined in paragraph (a) of this section and all waters within the United States tributary thereto; and. A third area of regulation involves workers' compensation claims. The concept of navigable waters is important in claims made under the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act of (33 U.S.C.A. §§ –). The act provides that employers are liable for injuries to sailors that occur upon navigable waters of the United States.